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Sunday, March 7, 2010

Hobby Tip: March

We are 7 days into March and I have been making great progress on my Loota Boyz. I have two of them done and a third should be finished tonight. I will get pictures posted once all five done.

Since I have no models to show I am going to post another hobby tip. When I first started painting miniatures I was wasting a lot of time waiting for paint to dry. If I did not let the paint dry I would end up smudging the paint while holding it. One of the guys at the game shop suggested using nails. My problem was solved and it has really helped improve my painting. I then took this process one step further.

First: I found a small piece of scrap wood (2X4) and drilled a lot of holes in it. I did not drill the holes all the way through the 2X4, just about 3/4 the way through. I use this piece of wood for holding the models when priming and painting.

Second: I purchased some nails from the hardware store and took about 10 of them and glued a rare earth magnet to the flat end. This is helpful for me because I use magnetized bases or metal bases. So when I get ready to paint a model all I have to do is take the nail with the magnet and snap them together. The one thing you have to keep in mind when you do this is to make sure the magnets polarization is correct. If it is not, then just free the magnet from the the nail and turn it around. If the model I am working on does not have a magnetized base or is not made out of metal, then I just glue the flat part of the nail to the bottom of the model. I will use white glue for plastic models and super glue for metal ones.

Why has this helped me? It provides me something other then the model to hold onto while I paint it. I have complete control of it and can hold the model in any position I need to get the job done. Then once the models is painted I can keep it on the nail and turn right around and dip it, clear coat it and I am done. I keep my models on the nails from priming to completion.

8 Comments:

Kuffeh said...

That's quite a good tip. I use corks myself. I find they're easy to hold and turn. Just pin the mini to the cork and I have a nice solid base to hold onto. And being as I pretty much always paint with the bases attached, I can get everywhere I need to.

Nice job.

Da Green Skins said...

Thank you Sir. I saw that you use corks and I started saving mine after I finish off a bottle of wine. I have not used them yet however I will give them a try one of these days.

Have a great day

Mike

Turuk said...

Nails and wood, a clever idea. I currently just hold the base and rotate the figure to paint, but I am in desperate need of a more effective way to control the model without having to do that or directly putting my fingers on it.

I really like this idea, and I will certainly be giving it a try soon

Warhammer39999 said...

Thanks for the tip.

I did have a question though: when you say that you "use magnetized bases" could you elaborate on that? I'm considering magnetizing my 'Nid bases for ease of storage, and was looking for a way to get started.

Da Green Skins said...

Warhammer 39999 thanks for the positive feedback on my post. Let me elaborate on my bases. I use different bases for different games. I purchase Gale Force 9 bases which are magnetized or I glue a rare earth magnet on the underside of a regular base. When using rare earth magnets you need to be careful. If you are going to magnetize a 40k army I would stay away from rare earth magnets. These are strong magnets and cause some problems when they are on the table. I suggest that you purchase some business cards size magnet sheets and glue them to the bottom of your bases. Then cut off the excess. I base my 40k armies on metal washers then line my storage box with magnetic strips. I hope this helps, if not let me know and I will put together a post for you on this.

Mike

Warhammer39999 said...

Thanks! I'll have to look into getting some of those magnetic sheets.

Plusje said...

Hey i was wondering if you just use straight up white primer or if you wash it really quickly with a grey or black wash as it seems like the recesses are darker on your models??

Thanks for your time

Greetings from Amsterdam! :)

Da Green Skins said...

Plusje I have just started using a home made wash on my models after I prime them. It helps pull out some of the details and makes it easier to paint.